One tin soldier will ride away

This song was for an movie that became a leftist icon. How ironic that the lyrics now speak to the right.

Because the left’s politics of hate, envy and greed — all done dishonestly in the name of heaven — will end badly. On judgment day, our nation of liberty will be gone. Just one tin soldier will ride away. Listen HERE.

Listen children to a story
That was written long ago
Bout a kingdom on a mountain
And the valley folk below.
On the mountain was a treasure
Buried deep beneath the stone.
And the valley people swore
They’d have it for their very own.

So go ahead and hate your neighbor,
Go ahead and cheat a friend.
Do it in the name of heaven,
You can justify it in the end.
There won’t be any trumpets blowing
Come the judgment day.
But on the bloody morning after
One tin soldier rides away.

So the people from the valley
Sent a message up the hill,
Asking for the buried treasure
Tons of gold for which they’d kill.
Came an answer from the kingdom
“With our brothers we will share
All the secrets of the mountain
All the riches buried there.”

Now the valley cried with anger
“Mount your horses, draw your swords.”
And they killed the mountain people
So they won their just rewards.
Now they stood beside the treasure
On the mountain, dark and red.
Turned the stone and looked beneath it
“Peace on earth” was all it said.

So go ahead and hate your neighbor
Go ahead and cheat a friend.
Do it in the name of heaven
You can justify it in the end.
There won’t be any trumpets blowing
Come the judgment day.
But on the bloody morning after
One tin soldier rides away.

Life, Liberty and Happiness

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Our parents’ generation had no time to pursue happiness. They were too busy saving the world.

But the blood, sweat and tears sacrificed by “the greatest generation” in saving the world wound up making them happy, too.

Their offspring — a generation that has bled less blood, perspired less perspiration and shed fewer tears than any generation in history — perceive “happiness” differently. They see happiness not as the incidental effect of a life lived well. For them, it’s the whole purpose of life.

“Happiness” is all we want. Our parents became happy by being great. We, in contrast, think we can become great by being happy.

We don’t exactly know how to achieve our happy goal, but we think we know how not to. “Happy life,” we happily theorize, must be the opposite of “hard work.”

So are we happy yet? Continue reading