I was an engineer for Boeing – before they got woke

Back in your correspondent’s Version 2.3 or thereabouts, he was an engineer for Boeing. This was back in 1978-79.

My starting salary was $15,400. When I left Boeing to start my personal Version 3.0, my salary was still less than $17,000. My parents thought I was crazy to give that up and take on debt to go to law school.

Boeing was booming. Airlines were being de-regulated, airline travel was becoming less expensive while still being slightly sexy, and everyone wanted to go to Europe for the first time.

Several things about Boeing stick out in my mind. First, they didn’t compromise on quality. The airline customers could specify whatever bells and whistles they were willing to pay for — I worked on a few custom planes for Saudi princes that included frivolities like solid gold ashtrays — but the airworthiness of the plane was non-negotiable.

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“Trigger” is being canceled because it triggers

In the theater of the absurd that passes for wokery, they ban words and phrases that purportedly trigger unpleasant emotions in the audience. These include:

“Mumbo jumbo” because it’s a corruption of the name of the African god Maamajomboo. Who knew?

“The most qualified person should get the job” because it triggers feelings of inferiority in persons who are inferior to the most qualified.

“Peanut gallery” because it triggers memories of the old days when black people sat there and ate peanuts. Don’t use that phrase, especially around a black person because the painful memories may reduce him (er, I mean them – see below) to tears.

“Cannibal” because it triggers the Carib tribe (oops, “tribe” is triggering, I meant the Carib cannibal community – see below) of the West Indies who ate people. But only as many as they needed to feed themselves.

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Making Satan great again: The glamorization of evil

“. . . leftists are morally disordered people . . . . perhaps the best way to prepare yourself for contending with them is to pretend you’re dealing with Satan.”

— Selwyn Duke

“Pretend”?

Satan may not be much more to you than a medieval caricature, looming large only in the minds of 17th century Puritans. The European Enlightenment, after all, disinfected such bogeymen with the light of Reason.

But one is tempted to ask, to what end? As Goethe wryly observed in Faust, thanks to The Enlightenment “The Evil One is gone, the evil ones remain.”

Who is this dude Satan? Jesus spoke of him a lot. As told by Matthew, he’s the subject of Christ’s first two parables. The second is particularly chilling, reading like the original screenplay for The Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

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